Latest post: Renewable solution needed: our response to the third IPCC report

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Jim Skea, CCC committee member and vice-chair of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Working Group III, set out the CCC’s response to the third IPCC report in an article for the Guardian.

Professor Skea said:

“The evidence is clear: sticking to business as usual will lead to temperature rises of three to five degrees above pre-industrial levels. This will potentially lead to catastrophic effects on water resources and agricultural productivity, and accelerate sea level rise.

“Hitting the two-degree target has not been ruled out, but the IPCC has concluded in its report that major changes would be needed to energy systems, requiring technological and institutional change on a massive scale.

“This could imply a tripling or quadrupling, by 2050, of cleaner electricity sources such as renewables, nuclear or fossil fuels, along with carbon capture and storage, and the aggressive pursuit of energy efficiency opportunities.”

You can read the full article on the Guardian website.

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